HEARING HEALTH

Hearing loss is a growing concern in Australia with 1 in 6 of the population having a hearing impairment.
This figure increases to 50% over the age of 60.

It is now recommended that annual hearing tests be conducted for all Australians over the age of 65 years.

Hearing Loss is Tied to Depression

Research shows that hearing loss is associated with an increased risk of depression in adults of all ages, but is most pronounced in 18 to 69-year-olds. Research also shows that the use of hearing aids reduces depressive symptoms.

Source: http://ow.ly/vvZEz Hearing Impairment Associated With Depression in US Adults, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010

Hearing Loss is Twice as Common in People with Diabetes

Hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes. Studies show that people with diabetes are twice as likely to have hearing loss. When broken down by age, one study showed that those 60 and younger are at greater risk.

Source: www.nih.gov (National Institutes of Health) Hearing Loss Is Common in People with Diabetes (2008 study)

Staying Fit may Also Help Your Hearing

Staying fit may also help your hearing. Studies into women’s health indicate that a higher level of physical activity is associated with a lower risk of hearing loss. Conversely, a higher body mass index (BMI) and larger waist circumference in women are each associated with a higher risk of hearing loss.

Source: http://brighamandwomens.org Press Release - Nov 25, 2013, Obesity Associated with Higher Risk of Hearing Loss in Women; Physical Activity Associated with Lower Risk

Hearing Loss is Tied to Common Pain Relievers

Hearing loss is tied to common pain relievers. One study found that the regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, or acetaminophen increases the risk of hearing loss in men, and the impact is larger on younger individuals. A separate study found that ibuprofen and acetaminophen are associated with an increased risk of hearing loss in women, with the link even stronger among women younger than 50 years.

Source: www.nih.gov (National Institutes of Health) Hearing Loss Is Common in People with Diabetes (2008 study)

Hearing Loss is Tied to Kidney Disease

Moderate chronic kidney disease is linked to hearing loss. Research has shown moderate chronic kidney disease to be associated with an increased risk of hearing loss.

Source: Eswari Vilayur MBBS, Bamani Gopinath PhD, David C Harris MD, PhD, George Burlutsky MApplStat, Catherine M McMahon PhD, Paul Mitchell MD PhD. Received: January 12, 2010; Accepted: May 24, 2010; Published The Association Between Reduced GFR and Hearing Loss: A Cross-sectional Population-Based Study

Hearing Loss and Dementia are Linked

Research not only shows a connection between hearing loss and dementia, but a Johns Hopkins study of older adults found that hearing loss actually accelerates brain function decline. Some experts believe that interventions, like hearing aids, could potentially delay or prevent dementia. Research is ongoing.

Source: www.hopkinsmedicine.org senior study investigator and Johns Hopkins otologist and epidemiologist Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D

Your Hearing May Say Something About Your Heart

Your hearing may say something about your heart. Cardiovascular and hearing health is linked. Some experts say the inner ear is so sensitive to blood flow that it’s possible that abnormalities in the cardiovascular system could be noted here earlier than in other less sensitive parts of the body.

Source: http://brighamandwomens.org Press Release - Nov 25, 2013, Obesity Associated with Higher Risk of Hearing Loss in Women; Physical Activity Associated with Lower Risk

Hearing Loss May Put You At Risk of Falling

Hearing loss may put you at greater risk of falling. A Johns Hopkins study showed that people in middle age (40 to 69) with even just mild hearing loss were nearly three times more likely to have a history of falling.

Source: www.hopkinsmedicine.org senior study investigator and Johns Hopkins otologist and epidemiologist Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D Hearing Loss Linked to Three-Fold Risk of Falling. Release date 27 February 2012

Hearing Aids Make a Great Difference

Hearing aid users say that their hearing aids have a significant, positive impact on their lives. This is shown by a study carried out in France, Germany and the UK.

The users especially state that their hearing aids improve their lives in terms of relationships at home, social life and group activities. The hearing aids also help them to communicate more effectively in most situations.

Source: The study, which was published in 2010, was carried out by the Swiss analysts Anovum on behalf of EHIMA, The European Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association. Around 15,000 people were involved in the study in Germany, France and England respectively and were asked about their hearing and use of hearing aids.

Hearing Loss is a Family Affair

A recent survey was done by the NCOA (National Council On Aging) on hearing loss and older adults found that when people began to use hearing aids, many saw improvements in their lives including mental health, sense of independence, social life, and sex life.

SOURCE: Wallhagen, Margaret. Hearing Loss: It’s a Family Affair. NCOA.org. June 19, 2012. http://www.ncoa.org

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